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Member Directed Spending Request Disclosures

Appropriations Committee Community Project Funding Requests

 

Project Name: Conneaut Harbor Dredging
Request Amount: $2,464,000
Intended Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Conneaut Harbor, OH
Recipient Address: 929 Broad Street, Conneaut, OH 44030
Financial Interest Certification
Request Explanation:
 This funding is necessary for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to complete additional dredging in FY2022. This additional funding to support dredging in Conneaut Harbor will ensure that dredging can continue in compliance with the new Ohio open lake placement ban which was put in place to protect water quality in Lake Erie.

Conneaut’s international port is critical to the Great Lakes region's economy, receiving important commodities for the region including coal, iron ore, aggregates, limestone, ores and minerals. According to USACE, waterborne transportation facilitated by the harbor supports $171.4 million in business revenue, 783 direct, indirect, and induced jobs, and $55.6 million in labor income. Commodities handled by the harbor support $6.2 billion in business revenue, 32,621 direct, indirect, and induced jobs, and $1.7 billion in labor income.

Dredging the harbor will allow for continued commercial traffic and safe navigation for commercial vessels. Without sufficient funding to dredge in the harbor, commercial operators would be forced to light-load their vessels. USACE estimates that losses of between two and three feet of channel depth in this harbor may result in increased transportation costs of between $1,753,000 and $3,727,000 annually.

In the worst-case scenario, without the resources necessary to dredge, Conneaut would have to close its harbor to commercial traffic which would require rail or truck transport of commodities. USACE estimates that this may increase annual emission rates by over 33,118 tons of harmful particulate matter and increase costs by an estimated $7,414,000 due to increased railroad-related accidents, and an estimated $4,953,000 due to increased trucking-related accidents.

 


 

Project Name: Fairport Harbor Dredging
Request Amount: $3,695,000
Intended Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fairport Harbor, OH
Recipient Address: 220 Third Street, Fairport Harbor, OH 44077
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: This funding is necessary for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to complete additional dredging in FY2022. This additional funding to support dredging in Fairport Harbor will ensure that dredging can continue in compliance with the new Ohio open lake placement ban which was put in place to protect water quality in Lake Erie. The Fairport Harbor is a deep draft commercial harbor which requires approximately 150,000 cubic yards of dredging every other year to maintain the navigation channel. The harbor was last dredged in 2019 resulting in removal of approximately 181,000 cubic yards of material. 

According to USACE, waterborne transportation facilitated by the harbor supports $71.8 million in business revenue annually, supporting 315 direct, indirect, and induced jobs that generate over $24.2 million per year in labor income to the transportation sector. USACE also estimates that commodities handled by the harbor support $371.2 million in business revenue, 1,933 direct, indirect, and induced jobs, and $103 million in labor income.

Dredging the harbor will allow for continued commercial traffic and safe navigation for commercial vessels. Without sufficient funding to dredge in the harbor, commercial operators would be forced to light-load their vessels. USACE estimates that losses of between one and two feet of channel depth may result in increased transportation costs of between $538,000 and $1,239,000 annually.

In the worst-case scenario, without the resources necessary to dredge, Fairport Harbor would have to close its harbor to commercial traffic which would require rail or truck transport of commodities. USACE estimates that this may increase annual emission rates by over 14,072 tons of harmful particulate matter and increase costs by an estimated $3,150,000 due to increased railroad-related accidents, and an estimated $2,105,000 due to increased trucking-related accidents.

 


 

Project Name: Great Lakes Coastal Resiliency Study
Request Amount: $500,000
Intended Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Recipient Address: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, 231 S. LaSalle St., Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60604
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation:
 The Alliance for the Great Lakes requested this funding for the Great Lakes Costal Resiliency Study. Coastal resiliency is the ability of coastal areas to withstand, recover from, and adapt to disturbances and underlying stress. The study is a regional initiative of the eight  Great Lakes States, working in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, United States Geological Survey,  Federal Emergency Management Agency and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The study area encompasses over 5,200 miles of shoreline along the five Great Lakes and their connecting channels in the states of IL, IN, MI, MN, NY, OH, PA and WI.

While this study has been authorized by Water Resources Development Act, it has yet to be funded. Investing in the resilience of the Great Lakes is critical to preventing coastal erosion, with the National Institute of Building Science found that every $1 spent on resilience can save $6 on disaster and mitigation costs. Rising and falling lake levels, the impacts of climate change, and ongoing infrastructure challenges along the Great Lakes coasts can cause serious problems. From erosion to property damage to natural disaster and other disturbances, coastal communities, ecosystems, and economies will need to improve resilience to withstand and adapt to these changes and challenges. 

Coastal erosion continues to threaten OH-14 shoreline communities. Mentor, which has 3,300 feet of shoreline abutting its marina and Lagoons Nature Preserve, has lost more than 6 acres to erosion in the last decade. Beach, access trails, roadways and other coastal infrastructure have been lost or damaged.

To protect the immense economic, environmental, and social value of the Great Lakes shoreline, this study would identify areas vulnerable to conditions that contribute to hydrologic uncertainty. The study would recommend measures to bolster the coastline’s ability to withstand, recover from, and adapt to future lake level conditions and increased storm severity. Without such a study, federal, state, and local agencies would continue to address coastal vulnerabilities through a piecemeal approach and would lack the necessary information to support effective, efficient management decisions.

 


 

Project Name: Lake County Emergency Operations Center
Request Amount: $1,000,000
Intended Recipient: Lake County Board of Commissioners
Recipient Address: 105 Main St. Painesville, OH 44077 
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The Lake County Board of Commissioners has requested this funding to build an updated Lake County Emergency Operations Center in order for it to continue effectively serving as the region’s epicenter for critical communications and logistical support between federal, state and local law enforcement, safety services and disaster related functions. Expansion and improvements to Lake County’s Emergency Operations Center are essential to ensuring the constituents of OH-14 receive adequate emergency services. 

The new facility would leverage traditional public safety responsibilities (Central Dispatch, Emergency Management Agency, Telecommunications Departments, amateur radio, etc.) with educational partners to create an opportunity for a mixed-use training facility. This portion of the facility will host all available Incident Command System (ICS), Center for Radiation/Nuclear Training (CTOS) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) courses while being open to all public safety organizations in northern Ohio. Currently, only one organization can conduct a training in the Operations Center at a time. However, this funding would allow for expanded areas where multiple trainings can occur simultaneously.

Lake County is one of the highest populated counties in Ohio’s 14th Congressional District. The current Emergency Operations Center was designed in the late 1970’s and constructed in the early 1980’s, becoming operational 36 years ago, in 1985. Since then, the Emergency Operations Center has been a vital link in different emergencies providing support to on scene responders, working under unified command using the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

 


 

Project Name: Ferry Drive Reconstruction
Intended Recipient: City of Ashtabula
Recipient Address: 4717 Main Ave., Ashtabula, OH 44004
Request Amount: $368,000
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The City of Ashtabula has requested this funding to rebuild Ferry Drive, which is a critical access road in Ashtabula Harbor. Ferry Drive is currently extremely dilapidated, with significant potholes that hinder access for prospective and existing businesses.

For decades, public and private entities have worked hard to ensure the health and vitality of the Ashtabula River. Rebuilding Ferry Drive will facilitate greater access and utilization of the river and the businesses along its east bank. Once rebuilt, Ferry Drive will enable existing industry means of ingress and egress on a road that will not damage vehicles or endanger passengers. It will also foster additional tourism activity that is critical to providing a balanced economic future for Ashtabula Harbor and the surrounding region.

Ashtabula Harbor plays an important role in Northeast Ohio's economy. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, commodities handled by the Harbor supports nearly 20,000 direct and indirect jobs and generates more than $3 billion annually in business revenue. Rebuilding Ferry Drive will ensure that businesses, tourists, and consumers can travel to their destination without concern to damage to their vehicle or for their safety. This project is critical to the continued revitalization of the Ashtabula Harbor and further growth of Ashtabula's regional economy.

 


 

Project Name: Wastewater Treatment Plant Major Infrastructure Rehabilitation & SSO Elimination
Request Amount: $4,500,000
Intended Recipient: Village of Chagrin Falls
Recipient Address: 21 W. Washington Street, Chagrin Falls, OH 44022
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The Village of Chagrin Falls has requested this funding to complete a major infrastructure rehabilitation project for the Chagrin Falls Wastewater Plant. 

This plant serves Chagrin Falls as well as portions of Bentleyville, Moreland Hills, South Russell, Russell Township and Bainbridge Township. The rehabilitation project will eliminate sanitary sewer overflows by enhancing plant capacity through modernized pumps and controls and an automated diversion system for high flows at an adjacent equalization tank. Replacing dilapidated plant equipment will expand the plant treatment capacity and reduce operating costs. 

Once modernized, the plant will greatly improve sewage treatment capability to comply with all United States Environmental Protection Agency standards while keeping community sewage rates at an acceptable level.

 


 

Project Name: Willoughby-Eastlake Water Pollution Control Center Lakeshore East Equalization Basin
Request Amount: $5,840,000
Intended Recipient: City of Willoughby
Recipient Address: 1 Public Square, Willoughby, OH 44094
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The City of Willoughby requested this funding to provide additional raw sewage capacity to its Willoughby-Eastlake Water Pollution Control Center. 

The Willoughby-Eastlake Water Pollution Control Center serves many communities across Lake County, including Willoughby, Eastlake, Timberlake, Lakeline and portions of Willowick, Willoughby Hills, Kirtland, Mentor, and Mentor-on-the-Lake.

This project will provide 1.35 million gallons of raw sewage storage capacity to the Center to ensure it is in compliance with SSO Elimination mandates and eliminate raw sewage overflows to the East Island area of the lower Chagrin River. 

 


 

Project Name: Shamrock/Brookstone Waterline Extension and Capacity
Request Amount: $570,000
Intended Recipient: City of Painesville
Recipient Address: 7 Richmond Street, PO Box 601, Painesville, OH 44077
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The City of Painesville requested this funding to install a 12-inch water main from Renaissance Boulevard along the Norfolk & Southern railroad tracks and under SR 44 to Shamrock Boulevard.

This water line is imperative for the redundancy and safety of the area’s drinking water affecting approximately 4,800 residents living and working in the area. It will also help meet the demands for future economic development purposes for Lake County, enabling approximately $400 million in new industrial and commercial investment. By increasing the capacity of water off Jackson Street, this project will ensure the area has the capacity to attract and serve new manufacturing facilities and job opportunities in close proximity to underserved populations.

 


 

Project Name: McFarland Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) Renovation & Upgrades
Intended Recipient: Geauga County Board of Commissioners
Request Amount: $800,000
Recipient Address: 470 Center Street, Building #4, Chardon, OH 44024
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: Geauga County has requested this funding to make necessary improvements and repairs to the McFarland WWTP to meet increased environmental protection regulations. 

McFarland WWTP is Geauga County’s largest wastewater treatment plant. Located in Bainbridge Township, it is designed to treat 1.8 million gallons per day and discharges to McFarland Creek, a tributary of the Chagrin River which flows to Lake Erie and is a well-used recreation location by both the local community and tourists. 

Out of all the 907 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitted wastewater treatment facilities in Ohio, McFarland ranks the third highest for the number of reported effluent water quality violations in the last three years. It is one of 21 facilities in the state which have been issued a formal enforcement action from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the last five years.

Due to its numerous NPDES permit violations, the County entered into an Administrative Order on Consent with the EPA, Region 5 (Chicago) on October 15, 2020 to make the necessary improvements and repairs to bring the plant into compliance by the end of 2023. Negotiations with an engineering firm to develop the plans and design are currently ongoing, with construction expected to begin in late 2022. The costs of this project will be considerable and the requested funding would be used to fund the planning and design of the renovation and upgrades to the plant.

 


 

Project Name: Munroe Falls Cuyahoga River Waterline Crossing
Request Amount: $1,040,000
Intended Recipient: City of Munroe Falls
Recipient Address: 43 Munroe Falls Avenue, Munroe Falls, OH 44262
Financial Disclosure Certification
Request Explanation: The City of Munroe Falls has requested this funding to install a 12-inch waterline under the Cuyahoga River.

This waterline will provide a redundant river crossing that is critical to ensure adequate water service remains available for the north half of the City at all times.

The current crossing was intended only as a secondary line but unfortunately is serving as the only and primary crossing. As the current line ages, breaks and failures become more likely. Without the redundant crossing, the north half of the City may experience a prolonged interruption of water service while emergency repairs or replacements are being performed.

 

Surface Transportation Reauthorization Member Designated Project Requests

 

Project Name: Miller Road/I-77 interchange - Brecksville
Project Location: Miller Road, Brecksville, OH 44141
Project Sponsor: City of Brecksville, Ohio Department of Transportation 
Requested Amount: $12,000,000
Financial Disclosure Certification
Project Explanation:
This project will complete the Miller Road interchange with I77. Currently, the interchange only provides a southbound exit and a northbound entrance ramp. Not only will this project improve safety for vehicles, as it will reroute vehicles to roadways meant to handle heavier traffic versus local roadways, but it is also expected to assist the City of Brecksville with the development of 300 acres of nearby property. This interchange project will provide access to that land and is vital to future economic development, including attracting employers to the area.

 


 

Project Name: ATB531- Ashtabula
Project Location: Lake Road West, Ashtabula, OH 44004
Project Sponsor: Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT)
Requested Amount: $2,400,000
Financial Disclosure Certification
Project Explanation: 
This project includes the study and design of a stretch of roadway (ATB531) between La Bounty Road and N. Main St. (SR193) in Ashtabula Township and North Kingsville, which is adjacent to Lake Erie. ODOT District 4 has been monitoring this area for many years and estimates that at the current rate of erosion, ATB531 will fall into Lake Erie in the next 15 years. This project will stabilize the roadway embankment to prevent the loss of pavement into Lake Erie. It is critical to securing the mobility of this important east-west connection network between the City of Conneaut and the City of Ashtabula. 

 


 

Project Name: US 422/Harper Road interchange - Solon
Project Location: Harper Road, Solon, OH 44139
Project Sponsor: City of Solon, Ohio Department of Transportation 
Requested Amount: $2,414,288
Financial Disclosure Certification
Project Explanation:
 This project will improve the existing US 422/Harper Road interchange with an innovative Diverging Diamond interchange. At least half of the employed workers in the City of Solon commute from outside of the City, making this interchange an important access point. This innovative interchange design includes a multi-use path that will link the industrial/manufacturing area of the city with the residential area north of the interchange and link to the Cleveland Metroparks. It will also reduce congestion related air quality issues while minimizing the project footprint to reduce significant costs needed for construction. 

 


 

Project Name: SR283-Mentor 
Project Location: Lakeshore Blvd, Mentor, OH 44060
Project Sponsor: Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT)
Requested Amount: $3,148,000
Financial Disclosure Certification
Project Explanation: 
This project will widen Lakeshore Blvd (SR 283) from SR 306 to Brooks Blvd. SR 283 is currently two lanes wide and will be widened to three lanes with the addition of a center turn lane. SR 283 is a critical east/west corridor connecting the cities of Willoughby, Mentor and Mentor on the Lake. Significant congestion exists along SR 283 resulting in increased vehicular collisions. This project will remove turning vehicles from through lanes, resulting in less frequent stops and associated collisions. This will reduce strain on emergency responders and will provide more efficient access to the adjacent communities.

This project, which is roughly 3,700 feet in length, was identified in a City of Mentor study as necessary to reduce congestion along the corridor and is included in the current Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA) long range plan. The project will also construct an eastbound to southbound right turn lane on SR 283 at the SR 306 intersection. This improvement was identified in two safety studies performed by ODOT and was found to be necessary to reduce collisions and improve safety at this intersection. This intersection appears on the State of Ohio’s list of “hot spots” for intersections with high numbers of collisions.